The British thirsts for a good football coach

Not all good players can become a good strategist, but having a bad coaching career like the former English players is strange.

Recently, Paul Scholes had to resign as the manager of Oldham Club playing in England’s Third Division after a series of disappointments – winning only 1 victory in 7 matches.

The time at Oldham midfielder M.U also only lasted exactly 1 month. So, 6 years after retirement, Scholes’ coach career is still just a round zero.

Before Scholes, the 1992 golden generation of M.U also repeatedly disappointed on the coach bench

Ryan Giggs was unable to stay at his former club after briefly leading the team as interim manager.

Gary Neville – quite successful with his career as a commentator and especially famous for disparaging other coaches – became a farce because of his bad time in Valencia. He was fired by Valencia after 4 months in the army and only brought 3 wins for the team.

Nicky Butt is no better than the M.U.’s academy coach job. And Phil Neville, after working as an assistant in Valencia for his brother Gary, has now moved to lead the English women’s football team.

In fact, it would be unfair to laugh at every generation of M.U’s famous players, because the English stars of Arsenal, Liverpool or Chelsea are nothing better.

The generation of former British players born in 1960-1970 is at the peak of their coaching career

Meanwhile, this generation of Italians including Antonio Conte, Gennaro Gattuso are currently world famous coaches; the French also have Didier Deschamps, Zinedine Zidane; Spain has Pep Guardiola, Luis Enrique; The Netherlands has Ronald Koeman and Frank Rijkaard; Germany has Jurgen Klinsmann, Thomas Doll, etc.

Meanwhile, during the past 10 years the English have trained only one coach with a little name is Gareth Southgate – who is leading the recruitment of three monks.

But Southgate’s talent still needs more time to evaluate, because before taking over England, he had never achieved any significant achievements.

The inability of English coaches is reflected in the Premier League itself. Out of the current 20 Premier League clubs, only 5 are using native coaches including Bournemouth, Burnley, Cardiff, Crystal Palace and Fulham.

It can not be said that because the Premier League is better than the other leagues, it is more demanding, because English football does not “export” any talented coaches abroad.

Without the ability to coach, most English players choose to be a commentator, like Michael Owen, Rio Ferdinand or Jamie Carragher.